Ruby Ramblings


DMZ
July 26, 2009, 2:32 pm
Filed under: economics, Korea, Peace, Politics, Travel, War | Tags:

The Demilitarized Zone tour, or DMZ as it is known, was one of the more interesting things I’ve done since being in Korea on many levels: at once a cultural event, an educational event about a hotspot for violence in the world, and an interesting look into how two countries are shaping their own history and public information.

It was also a chance to be around the type of foreigners that I’ve avoided since coming to Korea – the loud ones that think the whole bus needs to be regaled with their tales of drunkenness, sexual excursions, how various penises from around the world compare, and all the things Koreans do wrong. This in turn led us to make friends with two of the very cool type of foreigners who agreed that the other type were being way too loud and ruining our view.

Peace Bell

Peace Bell

For anyone back home who might not be aware, the DMZ is a swath of land bordered on both sides by a fence and razor wire, that divides North and South Korea. No one has been allowed onto this skinny piece of land that runs the entire width of the Korean peninsula for fifty years, and they claim it has become a haven for wildlife. Unfortunately, the most interesting parts of the tour were the parts we were not allowed to take pictures of.

First we stopped at Unification Park, where the fact that South Korea has turned this into a huge tourist venture is blatantly obvious. People from all over the world, including Koreans, come to the boarder in droves to glimpse a little of the insanity that is North Korea, and also to pay homage to the fact that eventually they may be a unified country again. They’ve gone as far as to build a theme park to keep the kiddies happy, and the start of a “bridge” that may one day join the two countries – an enormous steel structure that at the moment is truly a bridge to nowhere.

The North Korean border is family friendly!

The North Korean border is family friendly!

Our first stop after joining the larger tour was the Third Infiltration Tunnel. This was truly fascinating, and unfortunately we couldn’t take pics in the inside of the tunnel. South Korea has found four tunnels, the latest in 1990, that are assumed to built by NK to be used to tunnel in ground support for an air strike on South Korea. They believe there may be more tunnels that have yet to be found – yet another case were geologists and archaeologists may be of help – Jim and I were talking about how if they did a survey of the border with a resistivity machine, they’d find out pretty quick if there were more tunnels or not. I had a feeling that the threat of more tunnels might actually just be being used to keep people concerned.

One of the more interesting facts about the tunnels is that the North Koreans smudged them with coal and tried to claim that they were coal mines that went too far underground and “accidentally” made it over the border. Anyone who has worked in coal country doing survey knows this is utter BS. First of all, coal exists in layers (as it is formed by compression of layers of organic material over a long period of time), which is why strip mining is so popular. You need to strip off a broad swath to get the most coal; skinny tunnels would not be effective at all. The other reason is that the area is mostly granite, not a place where coal layers are likely to be found.

It is said that the North Korean government told its people that South Korea actually built the tunnels to infiltrate North Korea and ruin their society with their filthy westernized ways. One interesting thing about the video we saw before going into the tunnels is that it makes almost no mention of the American, British, or Soviet involvement with WWII and the Korean war. It shows footage of the two different factions of Koreans, calling it a “fratricidal” war – almost implying that no one else was involved.

The closest thing I could get to a tunnel shot, was an outside shot of where the recently bored new tunnel was constructed to join with the actual Infiltration tunnel so that tourists could go down into it. It is thirty meters underground and we had to wear hardhats – this is all getting very familiar.  Don’t forget your PPE! (If you don’t get it, don’t worry, it’s an inside joke.)

Entrance to the tourist tunnel

Entrance to the tourist tunnel

We moved on to the observation tower – and lucked out with having a gorgeous day with a great shot of the North Korean mountains, and a “city.” Apparently when North Korea became aware that this observation tower had been built, and tourists were coming to view this area, they promptly built a fake city to prove that North Korea is doing well and prospering. Someone comes to switch on and off the lights, but no one really lives there. You could really tell, to me it looked like one of those pre-fab midwestern towns where the Home Depot has been built, the townhouses are up, but no one has actually lived there yet. There is something so distinctive about the traces that humans leave, that I think we can really tell if no one has ever lived there even if it is made to look on the contrary. We were not allowed to take pics of this town either (or the map of the area inside the building).

You can almost see the "village", and the mountains were gorgeous.

You can almost see the "village", and the mountains were gorgeous.

At the observation tower overlooking the "villiage."

At the observation tower overlooking the "village."

The last stop was a blatant piece of overly optimistic propaganda. With the money raised from tourism, there has been an entire subway station built right at the border, complete with destination Pyeongyang, North Korea. It claims with absolute certainty that when North Korea collapses and is once again unified with South Korea, that the train line will eventually join with the Trans-Siberian, and Trans-China lines.  We were even able to use a “commemerative stamp” to stamp our tour books and prove we had been there.  Scrap-booking is apparenlty alive and well everywhere.  There were also large photos of when Bush came to the opening of this station, declaring his support for the unification of the peninsula.
DSCN0877

Although these are nice sentiments, is South Korea really willing to take on the financial, social, and political burden of bringing a populace of brain-washed people, who have a standard of living one hundred years behind the rest of the world, who truly believe that if you touch something western your hand could fall off, up to South Korean consumerist standards? (There was even some discussion that maybe they are looking at North Korea as a possibility for really cheap labor – a job now farmed out to Burmese, Pakastani, and Nepali folks. Using North Koreans would have the advantage of the people speaking at least some form of Korean.)  There was a windowless building next to the station, that the tour guide noted that she was required to tell us was a storage unit for goods from the area.  She was implying that that is not at all what it is, and more likely, I’m assuming it is probably a weapons cache or some such.

Of course there are also North Korean refugees who just really want to see their home again before they die. All along the border there were old ladies wearing pink and praying along the fences.  To me they were a much bigger sign of hope than subway stations that go nowhere.  At the end of the day, what people are willing to do for each other is really what  matters the most.

Pyongyang Train Station

Train Station to Pyeongyang

All in all, it was a fascinating, thumbs-up day.

DSCN0871

For anyone that cares, we used Grace Travel 02-332-8946.  48,000 won, but it does not take you to Pannumjeon – where the US and North Korean soldiers stand and stare at each other.  We’ll save that for another time.

Advertisements

7 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Very interesting post!

Comment by Jenny Yasi

Nice post about a place I haven’t yet visited 🙂 Haha on the PPE quip as well.

While certainly a tourist destination, the idea of a train station to Pyeongyang is something that extends beyond idealism – that train line (the Gyeongui line, which anyone with a T-money card can take) has recently been upgraded to run subway trains from Seoul Station to essentially the border (Dorasan) and further north whenever things with the North work out again. In many cases hope is what has helped the (South) Koreans thus far; it makes sense that they would continue to use it / draw some kind of strength from it. Nice job 🙂

Comment by Chris in South Korea

I have gone on this trip four times in the past three years. People keep coming to visit me and I don’t want them going by themselves. I am amazed each time I go. I agree with your thoughts on the unification. It will not be like Germany’s reunification, as many people try to compare it to.

Comment by Talya

I would totally do it again, and next time take one that actually goes to Pannumjeon. I want to see the soldiers staring each other down.

That’s one thing a couple of folks and I were talking about over beers after the trip. In many ways the segregated part of Berlin has only caught up to the rest of Germany in the last five years. For decades it has been a source of cheap labor and has had difficulty competing in the housing market and such, can you imagine how much worse those issues would be with North Korea? I don’t think it is a fair comparison at all.

Comment by therubycanary

Cool piece. You did some things I didn’t on the USO trip. If they ever resume the overnight excursions I am so in.

Comment by Val

When you go again, please give me a heads-up, as I would like to go with you.

Comment by bybee

had the pleasure of meeting you once. i’ve followed your digital proceedings surreptitiously since you and hawk left portland…5 years ago or so…as a college english instructor i’ve got to say shanna that the documentation of your travels and current readings is so good that it will no doubt lead to bigger things for you. if/when you come back to portland drop me a line.

Comment by paulm




Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: